About Polymer Clay and My Processes


The Process

Polymer clay requires “conditioning” which uses multiple passes through a Pasta Machine in order to mix the different polymers together. The final piece of jewelry is then baked in a convection oven for 45 minutes for each step, which can mean two or more times. After cooling, my pieces are then sanded 6-8 times up to a 2000 grit sandpaper, and are then buffed, or coated with a water-based seal to create a matte or glossy finished. The final step, is watching a customer pick out their perfect piece and see how beautiful they look while wearing it!


Mokume Gane Technique


I choose 3 - 4 colors and layer them in up to 10 layers or more. Some of these colors are what are called "Color Recipes" which means I have mixed 3 or more colors to create just one new one!
I layer these colors into a  mini-loaf (2“x3”), and push through the top of the stack with various tools
and shapes with either a design in mind, or a completely abstract approach.

Then the stack is compressed and I let it rest.
Next, with a tissue blade, I make razor-thin slices from the top of the stack,
and then place these slices on a thicker layer of clay.

This is where the truly artistic process happens!
After flattening the new layers a bit, I decide what area to select.
I then cut, bake, sand and polish my shape into the beautiful pieces you see here on this site!
Please enjoy!

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From Wikipedia

(木目金 Mokumegane) is a Japanese metalworking procedure which produces a mixed-metal laminate with distinctive layered patterns. Mokume gane translates closely to "wood grain metal" or "wood eye metal", describing the way the metal takes on the appearance of natural wood grain.
Mokume-gane has been used to create many artistic objects.
Though the technique was first created to decorate swords,
the art survives today mostly in the form of jewelry and hollowware.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mokume-gane 


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This technique is at least 4 centuries old, and has been cleverly adapted by Polymer Clay artists. 


Common brand names of Polymer Clay that I use include: Premo, Fimo, Sculpy and Kato Clay.